Used Car News from Moorland Cars


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Government's Red Tape consultation shows ......

20 December 2011

.... public opposition to reduced MOT frequency

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L-Plate drivers heading for the motorway

14 December 2011

Road safety minister Mike Penning has announced that from 2012 learner drivers will be allowed on motorways with the provision that it’s as part of a driving lesson with a qualified instructor. The aim is to cut the number of deaths on the nation's major roads involving young motorists.

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Fleets should prioritise driver safety this winter

14 December 2011

While the UK has enjoyed a milder start to winter in 2011 than in recent years, bad weather will still be a key issue over the coming months, particularly for fleets, says the Fleet Safety Forum.

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Road risk message fails to resonate with drivers

13 December 2011

Four out of five company car and van drivers are putting their safety at risk and damaging their employer’s bottom line by breaking speed limits.
 
Department for Transport (DfT) statistics show that 1,857 people were killed on Britain’s roads in 2010, with estimates suggesting a third died while driving for work.  However, a recent survey from ALD Automotive of more than 700 at-work drivers reveals that 85.5% continue to ignore crucial road safety messages.  Only 14.5% said they never drive above the legal speed limit, while 72.5% said they occasionally would drive at excessive speeds and 13% admitted to breaking the law on a regular basis.  The survey also suggests that speeding is more likely to occur on the motorway, with 79.5% of respondents admitting that is where the temptation is greatest, as opposed to 6% on dual carriageways, 2% on country roads and 1.7% in urban areas.
 
The Government has proposed raising the motorway speed limit from 70mph to 80mph, claiming the increase would be good for business (Fleet News, October 13).  Former transport secretary Philip Hammond said the consultation would begin this year, but the DFT told Fleet News that it would now get underway in the next few months.  It is expected it would take approximately 12 weeks to complete and if given the go-ahead it would be implemented in 2013.  However, driving at 80mph could use up to 20% more fuel than at 70mph, which could have serious consequences for company fuel bills, notwithstanding the obvious road safety implications.
 
Richard Hill, managing director of Peak Performance, said: “I think there’s a greater need for driver education.”  Hill recognises the fuel consumption argument, but says this isn’t a consideration for most company car drivers.  “Unfortunately it’s a case of how can I get from A to B as quickly as possible and that’s why we need to educate the driver about all the things that can be gained through safe and fuel-efficient driving,” he said.
 
The survey also found that 13% of drivers are still flouting the ban on the use of hand-held mobile phones while driving.  These findings come in the wake of another recent survey of nearly 500 company car drivers, which revealed 47% of respondents were ‘sometimes’ filling up with fuel at motorway services – normally the most expensive – and 2% were regular visitors.
 
Hill concludes that fleet managers need to employ “a clear and positive approach” to educating their drivers to achieve the maximum impact.  He said: “Corporates need to demonstrate the commercial benefits and personal benefits.  We are dealing with human beings – when we know there’s something in it for us, we are more likely to engage.”

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Grace period for London Low Emission Zone

13 December 2011

Vehicles being operated in the London Low Emission Zone (LEZ) without meeting its emission standards will not be penalised for a first offence, Transport for London has said. Instead of receiving a Penalty Charge Notice (PCN) on the first occasion they are seen, the registered keeper of a non-compliant vehicle will get a warning letter stating that they have 28 days in which to become compliant. The vehicle can be driven in the zone during this grace period.  

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